You certainly asked!

THANK YOU to all who participated in the 3rd Annual #AskAConductor Day on Twitter earlier this week. Remarkable stuff! Some friendships were rekindled, some new ones made, and I’m hoping that those who like live music (orchestras, choirs, musicals, opera, film, etc.) are now more aware of what conductors actually do, how they do it, and why.

After all, that’s the purpose of giving you a global opportunity to ask a conductor whatever you want!

If you missed it, glean the incredible list of original tweets from the transcript linked below and make sure you join my mailing list so you get to hear about next year’s event ahead of time.

But grab a last-minute chance now – add your question in the comments below and I’ll put it to ‘the crew’ and have a go at answering it myself. We don’t want you non-Tweeters to be left behind, so ask away!

Here are some 2012 #AskAConductor stats:

  • 1028 total tweets between December 11 & December 13 (Eastern Time)
  • 860 original tweets, 68 Retweets
  • 56 participants
  • Most questions from gabriela_hb in El Salvador
  • Top 3 tweeting conductors (excl. me):

Be sure to join in the fun next year!

Click here to download the full transcript (131KB. Need Adobe?)

 

First #OrchChat

Earlier this evening I hosted my first Twitter chat. Thanks to the encouragement, inspiration and sharing of resources from Lisa @PracticalWisdom it seemed to be a success! Well, I certainly enjoyed it, and time simply flew by.

And I’m impressed that a conductor from Finland joined in – it was 1am there when we started!

The three topics we explored, with very interesting opposite perspectives from performers and audiences, were:

  1. Do musicians who played in youth orchestras now advocate for or even attend orchestra concerts?
  2. Do concert halls help or hinder the success of orchestras?
  3. Why are some conductors marketed and treated like Rock Stars?

Click this link to read the transcript:

OrchChat-121120c

Please let me know in the comments below if we should do this again, and if we do, what topics would you like to discuss? Thanks to the following participants, who I hope will join us again next time (yet to be scheduled, because we’ll be doing another #AskAConductor in December…)

@AzuriteEnigma
@GrandmaOnDeck
@heatherc503
@MaestroDSCH
@MaestrosLover
@njd2245
@PracticalWisdom
@sashamakila
@StorkBrian

 

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Speaking of sticks…

Last week’s post was about a global traveler who should be using a stick (according to some conventions), but as noted he often doesn’t. Was it lost? Did somebody steal it? Was it delayed with his luggage? Well, we may have found it.

Fellow conductor and excellent classical music online blogger Kenneth Woods offers an explanation that I think may lead to the culprit: The Timpanist.

 

 

If you’ve ever wondered why the ‘drummer’ at the back of an orchestra needs so many sticks, read Kenneth’s post that explains it all as well as the exploration of the fact that some conductors request specific tools of the trade, and why.

http://kennethwoods.net/blog1/2012/08/05/more-secrets-of-the-timpanist-revealed-the-third-stick/

Think of three tools of your trade that you regularly use, are comfortable with, and consider yourself more of an expert than your boss may be. What are they?

Have stick, will travel

For several years the busiest conductor on the planet was Valery Gergiev. His conducting style is unique (to say the least) but he gets players rallied together to produce fantastic live performances.

Interestingly, he often doesn’t even use a stick (speaking vernacularly. The posh term is ‘baton’ but that’s one of those ‘tomahto, tomayto’ transatlantic words).

Hey – tweet this one:
UK/US translator: Tomahto, Tomaydo = BATTon, buhTONN via @STEphen_P_Brown

There’s one video out there of him conducting with a toothpick! He has three cell phones and keeps a suitcase of clothing in five cities in the world – at least if his flight is delayed he doesn’t have to wait around for his luggage.

Find out what it’s like to be a truly international conductor:

If you could travel the world doing what you love most, what would it be?

 

 

Feedback for Tapestry Tampa Bay

Watch the whole video below…

Conductor Composer Stephen P Brown presented his brand new composition “Tapestry Tampa Bay” to a new audience in Safety Harbor, Florida, on March 23 2012. Feedback has been amazing and very positive, with requests to orchestrate some of the movements as well as over 5,000 views of the concert video.

Check out why…

“Brilliant composition. Those of you that missed this concert, you missed out on a great night of beautiful and entertaining music.” -Barbara

“Tapestry Tampa Bay” simply amazing.” -Hamby

“Absolutely inspiring.” -Bill

“I’ll be Back for More!” -Mary

“Excellent. Can’t wait for the CD.” -Carlos

“Stephen is fearless in a new adventure, ready for a new challenge with a quiet confidence.” -Dale

“I love the stories, and then the music plays them out.” -Vanessa

“Totally refreshing and enjoyable. Please do it again.” -Ron

“What a wonderful surprise. I hope a tour comes out of this.” -Jill

Check out the video of Tapestry Tampa Bay on YouTube, and remember to LIKE it! (Give it a thumbs up). Also add your comments, similar to those above, to the video site:

Remember: Stephen is on a mission to RECONNECT hard-working, leisure-seeking people with that inexplicable element of music that affects us with laughter, crying and goose bumps. You can help by sharing this post on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and even your own blog! Thank you.
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