Seeking Leadership Stories

leadership01As a Conductor I am often held responsible not just for the instant moment-by-moment success of live music-making, but also the entire image, direction and resourcefulness of the whole organization. Every action and decision a leader makes directly influences outcomes and sales. (Click it to tweet it!)

As you know, that basically sums up the outcome of every leader’s work.

Leadership studies

So over the years I have studied and explored a great many leadership and management concepts and skills, including those espoused by Tom Peters, Michael Hyatt, Marie Forleo, Dave Ramsey, Richard Branson, John C. Maxwell, Michael E. Gerber, J. W. Marriott Jr., Charles Forte, Earl Nightingale, and a WHOLE host more (usually through biographies). In addition, since my teen years I have closely watched other leaders at work – conductors, business owners and corporate management – to learn what works well as well as what doesn’t seem to work well.

It’s been a fascinating journey. However, one thing I’ve noticed is how much Conducting orchestras, choirs and musicals not only incorporates almost every leadership skill out there, but very clearly and succinctly brings them altogether in one easily-observable package.

Really?

Yes, really.

So I’ve summarized what I’ve learnt, observed and tested (meaning: tried out in live environments) and written them down from a conductor’s point of view in¬†a cute little book. I think you’ll find it interesting. However, I’d like to marry these leadership concepts to non-musical examples that many others can identify with.

What’s your story?

Do you have a leadership story to share?

Do you have a leadership story to share?

If you are or have been a leader in any industry in any organization, I’d love to hear from you: Corporations, Small-Business, Community Groups, Governments, Sports, Church, School, Fundraising events, or wherever you have been responsible for leading others to achieve a mutual goal.

Check out the seven scenarios listed and if you have a story to share for any of them, add it to the comments (remember to log in FIRST, before writing your story!)

Thanks for your time and willingness to share your expertise and experiences. If you have any questions, please do send me an email

  1. You give the ‘Go!’ A launch, pep talk or somehow getting your team off to a great start

  2. You take note of how things are progressing and offer a little encouragement here, a little adjustment there…

  3. You can’t help but smile at what your team is accomplishing! You show your team how pleased you are with their efforts.

  4. Was there a time you or your boss didn’t trust the team to start on their own? Did you have to control how they began? Did such behavior prevent the most effective launch possible? How have you been a different leader since then?

  5. Was there a time you or your boss didn’t trust the team to do their work? Did you control every move they made? Did such behavior demotivate people? How have you been a different leader since then?

  6. Was there a time you or your boss were completely hands off and didn’t really know what the team were doing? Did such behavior prevent progress and/or quality outcomes? How have you been a different leader since then?

  7. Did you ever actively encourage your team to grow and become better than you (at what they do)? Did your team benefit from expanded skills, new approaches and advanced learning? How did that affect the team’s productivity?

THANK YOU ūüôā

 (Log in below to add your story)

A day in the life of you…

Can you help me? I’m not sure what ‘being productive’ means anymore. Perhaps you can share your thoughts below.

Many times I’m asked “What do you actually DO?”

Today (yesterday, by the time this is published) I accomplished the following:

Shopped for a new suit, baked some cookies, had a lunch meeting and then an afternoon chat, kept up with most of my emails and social media, completed an online training and prepared the content of a new financial report schedule for my team, watched some audience development, volunteer and photography tips videos on Youtube, and read Ken Blanchard’s book “Full Steam Ahead.” Yes, you read that correctly: I read a book in one day. It happens.SPB Serena

Some of the blog posts I indulged in today were by Chris Guillebeau and Marie Forleo, and there were moments I actually sat to watch Hook and The Blind Side. My early afternoon 7 minute nap actually took 20 minutes today, and my 25 minute walk was only 15 because the hot wind made it impossible to walk at a decent pace and I got worn out very quickly – the sunburn probably didn’t help, either. (Thinks: maybe reasons for the longer than normal nap, too?)

As dinner is cleared from the table and dessert prepared, I hopped onto the computer to share a day in the life of me, and yet there is plenty more to come, at least another 4 or 6 hours’ worth.

I have no idea if this is a lot to accomplish, normal, or less than most people do. Can you help me? Outline in the comments below what a day in the life of YOU looks like, and I’ll be able to determine if I’m being productive or not. Thank you – I appreciate it.

We will all likely learn a thing or two from you, as well…

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Very important people

How many very important people do you have in your life? The most difficult for me to get along with but who I value extremely highly, are lawyers. In the USA we need lawyers for just about everything, but especially in the music world. Did you know that most initial music industry contacts are made through lawyers? Not agents, not managers, not even the artists themselves.

Robert J. Stack, Esq.But lawyers¬†can be intimidating. They charge by the part-hour and good ones attract a hefty hourly rate – rightly so, but when talking or meeting or emailing or faxing their laywers,¬†many clients remain acutely aware of every second.¬†There are many nice lawyers out there who are also people, for example one skilled action-oriented chap¬†that deals with a lot of¬†non-business issues¬†sometimes focuses and bids on¬†tasks, not¬†open ended contracts.¬†After discussing the issue at hand he MIGHT just offer a flat rate to ‘get the job done.’¬†That is¬†really appreciated (FYI, it’s Robert J. Stack in Kinnelon NJ – tell him¬†who sent you!). Robert likes to chat about life, too – his family, our family, visiting¬†Florida, etc. and I always feel guilty in responding curtly and getting back to my point: all the while watching the second hand tick¬†round and round.¬†Rob is gracious enough¬†and seemingly¬†understands, but… as promised, he gets the job done.

On the other hand, there are lawyers who charge by the hour or part-thereof. Just one email¬†or one phone call, it’s an hour. Three or four emails and a brief contract review, also one hour. They don’t bill for anything less in any month. Gulp! Still,¬†they have¬†industry contacts that very few others have direct access to, and that makes them very special!

All in all, lawyers are some of the most VIP VIPs, despite my cautiousness and constant clock-watching. If you use a lawyer for anything, send them a note today – maybe even a handwritten card – just letting them know you appreciate them.¬†Sometimes we don’t do it often enough.

In the comments below, share how your relationship with your lawyer/s is/are Рcordial, professional, friendly, awful, etc. And how are you going to show them this weekend how much you appreciate what they do for you?